More than a Rural Revolt: Landscapes of Distress and the 2016 Presidential Election

Shannon Monnat, Penn State University, and David L. Brown, Cornell University Much has been written about the impact of the rural vote on the 2016 presidential election. To be sure, Trump received far greater shares of the rural vote than Clinton. This is not new; Republicans have typically won rural areas during past elections as…

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Marriage, Single Parenthood, and the 2016 Vote

W. Bradford Wilcox, National Marriage Project,  and Jon McEwan, Brigham Young University In post-2016 election takes, one factor has largely been overlooked: the family factor. At first glance, 2016 looks no different than previous presidential elections. The Republican Party presidential nominee usually does better with married voters and in counties with more two-parent families. This…

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The Real Structural Problem: The Self-Destruction of Capitalism

Randall Collins, University of Pennsylvania Sixty years ago, C. Wright Mills assembled a collective portrait of the elite that governs the United States. Domhoff and many follow-ups have shown that major positions in the U.S. government are almost entirely held by a small elite drawn from Wall Street financiers, big corporate businesses, upper-class universities, and…

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